Composed Upon Westminster Bridge

William Wordsworth

Earth has not anything to show more fair:
Dull would he be of soul who could pass by
A sight so touching in its majesty:
This City now doth, like a garment, wear
The beauty of the morning; silent, bare,
Ships, towers, domes, theatres, and temples lie
Open unto the fields, and to the sky;
All bright and glittering in the smokeless air.
Never did sun more beautifully steep
In his first splendour, valley, rock, or hill;
Ne'er saw I, never felt, a calm so deep!
The river glideth at his own sweet will:
Dear God! the very houses seem asleep;
And all that mighty heart is lying still!
© Short Édition

William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth was a major English Romantic poet. His joint publication with Samuel Taylor Coleridge, The Lyrical Ballads, helped to launch Romanticism in English literature.

His contact with the French Revolution brought about his interest in the "common" people’s life, troubles and speeches, which were of the utmost importance to his following works.

From 1843 to his death, he was Britain’s Poet Laureate.

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